Monggo Pinakbet

Exploring a harmonious blend of tastes and textures, this Filipino delight is a symphony of tropical veggies and exotic flavours. #FusionFeast. Savor a fusion of flavours with this delightful Filipino dish featuring mung beans, pork belly, shrimps, and an array of vibrant vegetables.

Hello, fellow food aficionados! Today, I’m thrilled to share with you a fusion that’s bound to excite your taste buds – the delicious marriage of two Filipino vegetable favourites: Monggo and Pinakbet. If there’s one thing we adore about Filipino cuisine, it’s the way it transforms humble vegetables into comforting and wholesome dishes. And in this culinary adventure, we’re diving into the world of Monggo Pinakbet, a dish that embodies the best of both worlds.

In the realm of Filipino cuisine, the hearty Pinakbet and the iconic Monggo hold special places in our hearts. The earthy flavours of Pinakbet, enriched with a shrimp-like essence, complement the comforting simplicity of the creamy Monggo. This unique combination not only satisfies our cravings for something hearty and nutritious but also presents a wonderful opportunity to create something truly exceptional.

Monggo, though often overshadowed by its more popular counterparts, has a charm of its own with its subtly savory taste and distinctive texture. It might not be as celebrated as other dishes, but it deserves its moment in the spotlight. In this Monggo Pinakbet recipe, I’ve harnessed the unique strengths of both Monggo and Pinakbet to create a dish that’s as nutritious as it is comforting.

Before we delve into the recipe, let’s take a moment to appreciate the histories of these two beloved dishes. Pinakbet, with its medley of vegetables and distinct flavours, hails from the northern Philippines, particularly the Ilocos region. This traditional dish often features a variety of locally sourced vegetables, combined with bagoong (fermented shrimp paste) to create a rich umami profile.

Monggo, on the other hand, is a mung bean stew that has been a staple in Filipino households for generations. Mung beans, rich in protein and nutrients, are cooked into a comforting porridge or stew, often seasoned with garlic, onion, and other aromatic ingredients. Monggo has become a symbol of simplicity, budget, nourishment, and a source of warmth during family gatherings.

Now, let’s embark on the culinary adventure of preparing Monggo Pinakbet. This delightful fusion dish beautifully marries the wholesome goodness of Monggo with the flavourful allure of Pinakbet.

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Monggo Pinakbet

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star 5 from 2 reviews
  • Author: Raymund
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 15 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 mins
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Main Course
  • Cuisine: Filipino

Description

Savor a fusion of flavours with this delightful Filipino dish featuring mung beans, pork belly, shrimps, and an array of vibrant vegetables.

 


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 150 g pork belly, cubed
  • 150 g shrimps, peeled and deveined
  • 1/2 small buttercup squash, cubed
  • 1 small bunch string beans, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 pcs Chinese eggplant
  • 12 pieces okra, cut in half
  • 1 bitter melon, cored and sliced
  • 2/3 cup mung beans
  • 2 tbsp bagoong alamang
  • 1 large tomato, cubed
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 pcs shallots onion, chopped
  • 1 cups water
  • 2 cups pork stock
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • oil

Instructions

  1. Soak mung beans in water overnight. Drain and set aside.
  2. Heat cooking oil in a pot than add and sauté garlic, shallots, and tomatoes until soft.
  3. Add pork belly and cook until lightly browned.
  4. Pour water and pork stock into the pot, stir in shrimp paste then bring it to a boil.
  5. Add soaked mung beans to the pot, cover, and simmer on low-medium heat for 45 minutes, check water levels occasionally and add water as needed.
  6. Add the buttercup squash, eggplant, bitter melon, okra, string beans, and shrimps. Cook for 8-10 minutes or until vegetables are cooked.
  7. Season with salt and ground black pepper. Transfer in serving bowls then serve.

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9 Responses

  1. I love that this recipe calls for both pork belly AND shrimp. It sounds like a super flavorful skillet meal. Count me in!






  2. Yum! Sound delightful and I can source all the ingredients, either at our local Asian supermarket or online. May give this one a try–sounds perfect for a chilly night (even though I suppose there aren’t many chilly nights in the Philippines.)

  3. Shrimp and pork belly always make me happy 🙂 This looks fabulous!

  4. Wow — the only cuisine I knew that combined pork and seafood was Portuguese. Now I know the Philippines has it, too. Really lovely combination of flavors.

  5. Vexijo says:

    This Filipino dish is a flavor explosion with its mix of mung beans, pork belly, shrimps, and vibrant vegetables. The step-by-step instructions make it easy to create this delightful and hearty meal, perfect for satisfying your taste buds with authentic Filipino flavors.
    ★★★★★






  6. Hannah says:

    Such a brilliant mashup of two winning dishes! I hate making decisions so this is the perfect way to get everything, without compromises.

  7. Neil says:

    I bet the flavours of this meld together so well and I can probably get the ingredients in my local Asian supermarket or online in order to make it. Yum!

  8. I’m a real veggie girl and this colorful dish would certainly please me.

  9. suituapui says:

    Prawns, can’t go wrong with those.

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