Tangsuyuk

A Korean Sweet and Sour Delight 👍🇰🇷🍛😋 Tangsuyuk is a popular Korean dish that consists of crispy pork or beef pieces coated in a special batter, then deep-fried to perfection and served with a delicious tangy sauce.

Tangsuyuk (탕수육) is a popular Korean Chinese dish that consists of deep-fried pork coated in a sweet and sour sauce. It is a delicious and flavourful dish that is sure to please everyone.

There are many different variations of tangsuyuk, but the basic ingredients are the same. Pork is first marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, and other spices. The pork is then deep-fried until it is golden brown and crispy. The fried pork is then coated in a sweet and sour sauce that is made with vinegar, sugar, ketchup, and other ingredients.

Tangsuyuk is typically served with rice and vegetables. It can also be served with noodles or on its own. Tangsuyuk is a delicious and flavourful dish that is sure to please everyone. It is a great dish to serve for a party or a special occasion.

The history of tangsuyuk is a bit murky, there are many different theories about the origin of tangsuyuk. Some believe that it originated in the city of Nanjing, China, during the Ming Dynasty. Others believe that it originated in the city of Shanghai, China, during the Qing Dynasty. Still others believe that it originated in the city of Guangzhou, China, during the Republic of China. Either way all the three theories are saying that it all originated in China. It is thought to have been brought to Korea by Chinese immigrants in the late 19th century.

No matter where it originated, tangsuyuk quickly became popular in Korea. It is now one of the most popular dishes in the country. Tangsuyuk is often served at Korean restaurants and at home. It is also a popular dish at parties and special occasions.

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Tangsuyuk

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star 5 from 3 reviews
  • Author: Raymund
  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 35 mins
  • Yield: 6 1x
  • Category: Main Course
  • Cuisine: Korean

Description

Tangsuyuk is a popular Korean dish that consists of crispy pork or beef pieces coated in a special batter, then deep-fried to perfection and served with a delicious tangy sauce.


Ingredients

Units Scale

Meat and Vegetables

  • 700 g pork shoulder or beef rib eye, cut into 2 1/2-inch-long strips
  • 1 small carrot, sliced
  • 1/2 small red capsicum, sliced
  • 1/2 small green capsicum, sliced
  • 1 small white onion, sliced
  • 1/4 cup dried wood ear fungus, rehydrated (optional)
  • 1/2 small cucumber, sliced
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
  • oil, for deep frying

Batter

  • 1 1/2 cup potato starch, soaked in 1 1/2 cup of water for 2 hours
  • 1 small egg. lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 tbsp oil

Sauce

  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 6 tbsp sugar
  • 3 tbsp white vinegar
  • salt
  • 2 tbsp potato starch diluted in 1/4 cup water

Instructions

  1. Combine 1 1/2 cups of starch with 1 1/2 cups of water and refrigerate until needed. The mixture will separate after two hours, carefully pour out the soaking water from the starch, then mix the soaked starch with egg and oil. The mixture will be stiff, but the oil will help loosen it.
  2. Mix well together pork or beef strips with grated ginger, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Combine and coat the meat with the starch batter.
  3. In a 180C preheated oil in a deep fryer or wok, carefully drop the meat in the oil one piece at a time, avoiding overcrowding. Cook until golden brown, about 3 minutes, in two or three batches. Reheat the oil to 180C between batches.
  4. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon and drain on a wire rack or in a large mesh strainer set over a bowl. Reheat the oil to 180C, then deep fry the meat again for 3 minutes or until meat is golden brown and crispy. Drain on a wire rack or in a large mesh strainer set over a bowl.
  5. In a pan, add 1 1/2 cups of water and the remaining sauce ingredients apart from the diluted potato starch. Bring to a boil until the sugar melts.
  6. Add the carrot, onion, and wood ear fungus let the sauce boil again then add the diluted potato starch, stirring well. Taste the sauce and add more sugar or vinegar if desired. Turn off the heat, then add the green and red capsicum. The residual heat will cook the capsicum and retain the vibrant colour
  7. Place the meat on a large serving plate and pour the tangsuyuk sauce on top or serve the sauce on the side. Serve immediately.

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7 Responses

  1. They look very crispy and I bet they are very addictive too.

  2. This looks and sounds fantastic. The pieces of meat look quite a lot like walnuts. I’m adding this to my list of many recipes of yours that I need to try.

  3. Michelle says:

    Looks so appetizing! Love the addition of the wood ear fungus to the dish — will have to give this a try!






  4. I’m normally not a huge fan of battered and deep-fried meat and poultry (fish & chips is a different story!) But this one looks so appetizing and delicious – crisp yet a tad chewy, nicely browned, and not oily / soggy. I don’t think I’ve ever had Tangsuyuk, but I would definitely enjoy some!






  5. suituapui says:

    Looks like what they call chicken popcorn here. Anything deep fried is a sure hit especially among the young ones.

  6. I’ve heard about frying things with a potato starch batter, but I’ve never tried it myself. This pork looks mouthwatering, Raymund!






  7. Hannah says:

    That looks so crispy and downright addictive! I swear, Korean fried-anything is so much better than pretty much every other version. They just have the technique and ratios for the batter perfected.

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