Pospas de Gallina

Goto, Arrozcaldo, Lugaw and Pospas de Gallina what are the differences between these Filipino style congee? Many of us use at least the first three names interchangeably with this chicken and rice porridge dish, even I never knew what a real arrozcaldo was. Now to set things correctly here is what each of this dish is made of.


Lugaw – the most basic of them all and also the generic Filipino name for rice porridge, basically this is rice and water with a bit of salt and/or sugar. Additional toppings can be added but after the cooking process, ingredients such as fried garlic, spring onions, boiled eggs, pork floss and/or crushed chicharon.
Arrozcaldo – this is a type of lugaw, but it is cooked by sautéing garlic, ginger and onions before adding the rice and water/broth. Traditionally the authentic Arrozcaldo is made with beef meat and beef broth not chicken, but since chicken is more budget friendly than beef, it replaced beef and became more popular since then, now arrozcaldo is popularly associated to chicken and not beef. Most arrozcaldos are prepared with flaked chicken.
Goto – this is a type of lugaw and its also known as arroz caldo con goto, similar preparation to arrozcaldo but instead of using beef meat or chicken, it uses beef tripe (or goto in Tagalog) and sometimes fried cubed pork and/or chicharon.
Pospas de Gallina – The most uncommon name of all and it’s probably the most popular from these four porridge types, people just don’t use this name anymore, in fact there are few restaurants uses this name on their menu. Pospas de Gallina is the Chicken version of the Arrozcaldo, traditionally whole chicken pieces are used, take note it’s not flaked but a whole section cuts such as leg, thighs and wings.

For all versions apart from lugaw, kasubha or safflower can be used to give it a more desirable hunger inducing light yellow orange colour.

For our recipe today we will make the Pospas de Gallina, the simple chicken rice porridge that everyone calls Arrozcaldo, even me. It’s a very hearty comforting dish that is usually served during cold rainy nights and/or even served as an aid to cure the common cold, I had a lot of this growing up and most of the times it was served when I have colds and flu. This is the Filipino’s answer to chicken soup as it warms your soul.

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Pospas de Gallina

  • Author: Raymund
  • Prep Time: 15 mins
  • Cook Time: 50 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hour 5 mins
  • Yield: 6-8 1x
  • Category: Main Dish
  • Cuisine: Filipino

Description

Pospas de Gallina is a type of Filipino congee prepared with whole chicken sections cooked with rice, garlic, ginger and onions.



Scale

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 kg chicken legs, thighs and/or wings
  • 1 1/2 cup rice
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 garlic, minced
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 1 medium ginger, sliced thinly
  • 1 tsp safflower (kasubha)
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • fish sauce
  • oil
  • 2 lemon
  • 1/2 cup spring onions, chopped
  • fried garlic
  • 6 hard-boiled eggs

Instructions

  1. In a pot add oil then brown chicken pieces on all sides.
  2. Push chicken to the side then add garlic, onion and ginger, sauté for a couple of minutes.
  3. Add chicken stock, water, safflower and rice, let it boil and simmer for 40 minutes, mix every 5 minutes to avoid rice sticking below the pot.
  4. Season with fish sauce and freshly ground black pepper. Turn the heat off.
  5. Scoop rice porridge and chicken in a deep bowl, add one egg then top with spring onions and fried garlic. Serve with lemon on the side.

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4 Responses

  1. From what you described, I think I like Arrozcaldo and Goto more because of beef and tripe. But I definitely want to try your Pospas de Gallina! O boy….that looks so good!

  2. That looks like comfort in a bowl, Raymund! And it is so simple to make. When I was a kid, “chicken and rice” soup was one of my go-to favorites.

  3. This dish reminds me a little of a Spanish dish I made called ‘Lobster with Rice Caldoso.’ The rice was cooked in a moist broth, rather than drying out the liquid. Great flavors here!

  4. suituapui says:

    I’d love this! I love congee!

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