Ube Pandesal

Can’t get enough of ube? We had seen this humble Filipino root crop become really popular nowadays. Filipinos all over the world try to incorporate this purple wonder in many things like sinigang, pancake, empanadas, macaroons and doughnuts to name some, while I tried most of them there is one ube recipe I haven’t made to date and it’s this ube pandesal.


This ube pandesal recipe uses real ube which we steamed and mashed, unlike other recipes online where it heavily relies on ube flavouring, while that is totally ok, it would not yield a natural taste, at the same time it would not be as soft and moist as our recipe. This bread recipe is like those recipes that uses mashed potatoes or potato flakes as they impart a really nice texture to the bread, the fibres from the root crops helps to keep the moisture in at the same time making it softer than other breads.

So stop looking for that ube pandesal recipe, try this one first and I am sure you will keep this one for a long time.

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Ube Pandesal

  • Author: Raymund
  • Prep Time: 30 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Total Time: 45 mins
  • Yield: 24 medium or 30 small buns 1x
  • Category: Snack
  • Cuisine: Filipino

Description

Ube is quite popular nowadays everyone puts it everywhere, in champorado, cookies, doughnuts, pancakes and now I am trying it in a pandesal.



Scale

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 cups high grade flour + some for dusting
  • 1/2 tightly packed cup mashed steamed ube
  • 75 g butter, softened
  • 1 cup full cream milk
  • ¼ cup warm water
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • 1 tsp of salt
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 3 tsp yeast
  • breadcrumbs
  • several drops ube flavocol, adjust to the colour you require

Instructions

  1. Dissolve the yeast in warm water, set aside until bubbly.
  2. Mix in milk, egg, sugar and melted butter.
  3. In a clean and flat surface place flour and salt then make a well in a middle, pour the liquid in the centre and start combining the wet (with mashed ube) and dry ingredients.
  4. Knead the dough for 15 minutes until it resembles a soft clay. Place flour on the surface if needed to avoid sticking.
  5. Once finished kneading, shape the dough into a ball then place in a large bowl, cover with damp cloth then let it rise for an hour on a warm location.
  6. Lightly deflate the dough, divide into rolls of 1-inch diameters, cut into 1.5-inch pieces then form into small buns, place on a baking pan lined with parchment paper.
  7. Set aside in a warm location and let it rise for 1 hour.
  8. Sprinkle breadcrumbs on top then bake on a 200C pre heated oven for 12-15 minutes or until golden brown.

Notes

  • If you don’t have ube you can use mashed potatoes or mashed sweet potatoes. You can also totally omit the mashed ube and replace it with equal amounts of all-purpose flour. In doing so you will heavily rely on the ube flavouring for the taste.
  • Total Time does not include rising time
  • You can also use a bread maker to make things easy, if doing so you will need to omit steps 3 to 5, just dump everything in the bread maker, set into dough mode.
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6 Responses

  1. I love ube! Had ube ice cream when I was in Manila many years ago and it was awesome. These mini ube buns look phenomenal!

  2. Oh boy- there is a Filipino supermarket near me. I’ll see if they have ube. By the way, this market also sells lots of whole fish (with heads on, etc). Other American supermarkets rarely carry whole fish!

  3. I assume (after looking online) that ube is a purple yam/sweet potato – is that right? These are not only beautiful, they sound really good, Raymund.

  4. Hannah says:

    I absolutely LOVE the color! I’m a sucker for pretty food, and this certainly fits the bill. Thankfully, there’s real flavor behind those looks (substance AND style) which puts this firmly on my “must make” list. Always happy to have more ideas for featuring ube, too.

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