Tinumis sa Sampaloc

In most parts of the Philippines there is dinuguan, in Nueva Ecija and Bulacan there is Tinumis. Tinumis is a dish prepared with cubed pork pieces sautéed in garlic, ginger, onions and tomatoes cooked with a souring agent like kamias, tamarind, tamarind flower and/or tamarind leaves, most of the time it is cooked with pig’s blood but it can be prepared without.


The origins of this dish most probably came from dinuguan, and dinuguan came from sampayna which explains how pigs blood become a part of the Filipino cuisine. In Cagayan de Oro when they prepare lechon it is inevitable that sampayna (dinuguan served with offal cuts) will be prepared as well, it has been this case traditionally as it makes a lot of sense. When butchering a whole pig, blood is drained and internal organs are removed, and with the Filipino trait of making sure nothing ever goes to waste, the lungs, heart and intestines together with the blood becomes another beautiful dish in the form of sampanya.

The first time I had this dish I can forget as I was tricked into thinking it is a chocolate pork, until now some parents in the Philippines still tell their children that’s the case until you tasted it. Some kids do not bother as they will really think it’s made with chocolate only savoury but for me even at a young age I know what a cocoa taste like. Anyways I never mind because I like the dish regardless, how about you will you ever like this dish?

Tinumis sa Sampaloc
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 750 g pork belly, sliced into small cubes
  • 1¼ cups pigs’ blood
  • 3 cups water
  • 6 green finger chillies
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 whole garlic, minced
  • ½ thumb sized ginger, minced
  • 1 large onions, finely chopped
  • 20 g packet sinigang mix
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
Instructions
  1. In a pot add oil then brown pork belly pieces
  2. Add garlic, onion and ginger and cook until onions turn soft.
  3. Add the chillies, tomato, sinigang mix and water, bring to a boil then simmer for 30 minutes.
  4. Add pork blood then, slowly simmer for 20 minutes.
  5. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

 


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3 Responses

  1. kitchenriffs says:

    I’ve had sausages made with pig’s blood, but never a main course like this. A lot of old-time dishes used to use blood, but you just don’t see that these days, at least in the US (hard to get fresh blood, I suppose). Anyway, this looks so good! Even if it doesn’t contain any chocolate. 🙂

  2. Gina says:

    Most of pork supply in US comes from China. Ask the butcher where the pork in their store comes from. One might have better luck from Latino stores, where they make & sell blood sausage.

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