Guest Post : Lalaine from Kawaing Pinoy featuring Pozole Rojo

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A couple of days ago I guest posted at Kawaling Pinoy now its her time to guest post here at Ang Sarap. I haven’t done guest posts for quite sometime and totally forgot that idea until Lalaine approached me whether this is a possibility, I immidiately agreed specially knowing the consistency and quality of posts you get from her blog. I had been to her blog several times and was always inspired on how it is beautifully presented just look at this Lumpiang Ubod and Lechon Kawali. Not just that she also posts unique Filipino recipes that is hard to find on other sites like this Sizzling Balut (Sizzling Duck Embryo Eggs and Tinolang Palaka (Frog and Ginger Soup). So without further ado let me present you Lalaine from Kawaling Pinoy.


Kawaling Pinoy

I’ve been a huge fan of Ang Sarap since I discovered it 2 years ago. Not only am I in awe of Raymund’s photography, I especially enjoy reading the snippets of history and personal stories he serves up with his recipes. Over the last couple of years, I would visit his blog daily, drool over pages of mouth-watering pictures and spend the rest of day hungry. Anyway, as it turned out, Raymund is not only a brilliant recipe developer but he also excels in building a community around the blogosphere. I nervously emailed him a week ago asking if I could guest post on Ang Sarap and he soon put me out of my trepidation by not only agreeing to my possible guesting, but suggesting we exchange recipes on our sites as well. #onecoolguy.

Since we have officially entered the colder BER months in my part of the world, I decided on Pozole Rojo as the recipe to share with you today. Pozole is a hearty Mexican stew made with pork (or chicken, if you are so inclined) and hominy. Its robust broth is spiced by the use of dried chili pods such as guajillo, ancho or California. Garnishes which includes shredded cabbage, cilantro, onions and red radishes complete the delicious experience. Having lived for many years in a melting pot such is Southern California, my palate has been heavily influenced by the cuisines aplenty around me. Mexican fare has become a favorite and this Pozole Rojo and its many variations have found a steady place at my dinner table. I like that the soup uses cuts of meat that are familiar in my own food culture (neckbones and trotters) but I most appreciate the exciting foray to spices I’ve never tried in the Philippines. This recipe makes a huge pot, comfortably serving 6 to 8 with plenty left to share. Enjoy and keep warm, folks!

Pozole Rojo
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 6-8
Ingredients
Pozole Rojo
  • 6 pounds pork (combination of pig trotters, pork neckbones and pork shoulder)
  • 8 ounces guajillo chili pods
  • 1 (108 ounces) can Hominy, drained and rinsed
  • 1 head garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 1 onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 tablespoon Mexican dried oregano, crumbled
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 4 to 4-1/2 quarts water
  • salt to taste (I used about 2 tablespoons)
Garnishes
  • 2 bunches red radish, ends trimmed (discard leaves) and sliced thinly
  • 1 bunch cilantro, stems trimmed and chopped
  • 1 large onion, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cabbage, shredded
  • limes, cut into wedges
  • tostadas
Instructions
  1. In a large deep pot, combine pork meat and water. Bring to a boil, skimming foam that floats to top. When the broth clears, add onion, oregano and bay leaves. Lower heat, cover and simmer for about 1 to 1-1/2 hours, adding more water in 1 cup increments as needed to maintain about 4 quarts.
  2. Remove stems off chili pods. Pry open and remove seeds. In a bowl, soak in just enough water to cover for about 30 minutes or until softened. In a blender, process softened chilies, garlic and the soaking liquid until smooth. Using a fine mesh sieve, strain the red sauce to remove any stray bits and pieces. Add sauce to pot of simmering meat. Add hominy. Season with salt to taste. Continue to simmer, covered, for about 1 to 1-1/2 hours or until meat is fork tender. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with toppings. Serve piping hot with tostadas and lime wedges.

 

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4 Responses

  1. Shobelyn says:

    I am a fan of Lalaine too. It’ s so nice that two of my favs are pooling together to share great recipes.

  2. It’s been a while since I really indulged in some deliciously spicy food! I definitely look at this bowl of comfort and think of how amazing those mexican flavours would be, along side the crisp radish garnish. I need a margherita now too, if only! 🙂

  3. mjskit says:

    This is one of my favorite stews!! Love your recipe and all of your garnishes! Thanks for sharing and Raymund, thanks for introducing Lailaine!

  1. November 5, 2014

    […] cuisine and to learn how to make your own pot at home, please head over to Ang Sarap for the recipe. While you’re there, make sure to check to out more of Raymund’s delicious creations. […]

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