Nilagang Baka

Nilagang Baka or Boiled Beef is one of the simplest dishes you will encounter but don’t be deceived by its simplicity because once done right it will be flavourful. So how really simple it is? Well the most basic ingredient to make one only uses beef, water, onion, peppercorn, salt and vegetables. It is very old recipe which definitely din not originate in the Philippines, in fact I remembered reading some passages in the bible that they ate boiled calf during those times. Cooking this is also simple all you need is to dump everything in the pot and let it boil until meat is really tender, they key to making it really flavourful is to use the cheap cuts and the bony ones as they have more flavour.


There are a lot of variations of this dish that is why some add plantain bananas, bok choy, carrots and/or potatoes but for my recipe I usually add corn and spring onions which gives it a different flavour dimension.

Nilagang Baka
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1½ kg beef (any bony part, ribs or neck)
  • 2 pcs corn on the cob, cut into sections
  • 3 medium potatoes, quartered
  • ½ cabbage, sliced
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 1 bunch spring onions, sliced
  • water
  • 1 tbsp whole peppercorns
  • freshly ground pepper
  • fish sauce
Instructions
  1. On a pot add beef, corn, onions and peppercorn together with water (just enough to cover the beef).
  2. Bring it to a boil and simmer for 1 hour.
  3. Add the potatoes and boil if fro 30 more minutes or until beef is very tender.
  4. Add cabbage and spring onions cook for additional 2 minutes.
  5. Flavour with fish sauce and season with freshly ground black pepper.

 


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8 Responses

  1. I love sime flavours and corn cob & onion are so classic, they marry well with many different proteins. I remember when cheap cuts, we’re exactly that! Nowadays everything gets so trendy, they’re on par with the premium meats! Lol 🙂

  2. I love how easy this is to make and how you can create a variety of flavors depending on what veggies you use.

  3. kitchenriffs says:

    What a cool recipe! Love this — thanks.

  4. This is true comfort food, isn’t it? Lovely meal.

  1. December 3, 2014

    […] spices like coriander, cinnamon, chilli, onions and aniseed. A very similar dish to the Philippine Nilagang Baka (Boiled Beef) except for the spices used. The first time I tried this was in a food court in a Mid […]

  2. January 13, 2016

    […] Nilaga, Tinola and Suam. What are the differences among them? I still remember the elder women in my […]

  3. May 26, 2016

    […] Lauya is a close relative of the beef nilaga, almost similar cooking methods but the only major difference is the use of ginger, lots of it. […]

  4. September 19, 2016

    […] big difference was the tomatoes, jalapeno and cilantro, the remainder is exactly what you put in Nilagang Baka. Having said that I have high hopes that Filipinos would love […]

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