Chicken Tinola

Tinola, the Pinoy version of the chicken soup and like any other chicken soups it gives you that comforting effect even the ill feels relieved. Having said that soups like this will always be good for the cold and rainy days. So what’s the difference with this Filipino version of the chicken soup?


Tinola’s secret ingredient is ginger which completes the formula for a good soothing and comforting soup, alongside with chicken, green papaya or chayote, chilli leaves and a green leafy vegetable it gives you enough nutrients to fight those nasty cold and flu bugs.

Tinola is an authentic Filipino dish, in fact it was invented around 1800’s and even referenced in Jose Rizal’s book Noli Me Tangere in Chapter 3 where Capitan Tiago ordered the said dish after he missed eating it for a long time when he extended his stay in Europe. If you are planning to cook the original recipe and you don’t live in a tropical country like the Philippines then I wish you good luck searching for the original ingredients like chayote, green papaya, malunggay (moringa leaves) and finger chilli leaves is really hard, you might find some in Asian grocers but they are all frozen. Having said that Filipinos learned how to improvise and choose other ingredients to replace the original one as long as the ginger is there the essence of this soup remains.

Chicken Tinola
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Serves: 4-6
Ingredients
  • 1 kg free range chicken thighs and legs
  • 1 – 1.5 litre chicken stock
  • 2 medium sized chayote or 1 medium sized green papaya cubed
  • 1 bunch spinach leaves, malunggay leaves or watercress
  • 1 bunch finger chilli leaves or capsicum leaves
  • 1 thumb sized ginger, thinly sliced
  • 1 large red onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • oil
  • fish sauce or sea salt
  • ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. In a pot heat oil and sauté garlic, onions and ginger. Cook until onions are soft.
  2. Add chicken and stir fry for 2 minutes in high heat browning all sides.
  3. Add chicken stock, bring to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes, if you are not using free range 20 minutes would be enough.
  4. Add chayote or green papaya and simmer for additional 15 minutes
  5. Add chilli leaves and spinach leaves/malunggay, cover and simmer for 1 more minute.
  6. Season with fish sauce and freshly ground pepper.

 

You can buy Jose Rizal’s Novel in Amazon, here are some links:


Recommended

13 Responses

  1. Kristy says:

    I’ve never seen chicken soup with whole pieces of chicken. That looks really good. I like the use of ginger too. That would be a fabulous healing soup!

  2. heyloraine says:

    you tinola looks sooo good. now Im hungry. i will definitely cook this tomorrow!

  3. Looks like a comfort food at it’s best.

  4. Sammie says:

    This is totally comfort food! I can have it any time of the day!

  5. Dear Raymund,

    I love chicken soup with chicken pieces on the bone, looks so hearty.

  6. what a lovely comforting dish, especially with kampung or free range chicken

  7. This looks so soothing and hearty. I love the ginger element.

  8. I love looking at variations on a old favourite. This is definitely going in the ‘comfort me’ food files, for next time I have a blue/or rainy day!

  9. huntfortheverybest says:

    this is one of those dishes that soothes the soul!

  1. November 19, 2015

    […] Binakol is a chicken soup dish similar to Tinola but instead of using rice wash or normal water this chicken soup dish is cooked in coconut water. […]

  2. November 23, 2015

    […] Making this is not that hard at all. The complexity in making them is similar to cooking tinola where you just sauté the normal garlic and onions then just wait for it to simmer and become […]

  3. January 4, 2016

    […] chicken this can be cooked in many ways but for us before we just add them in pancit, tinola and adobo but if you just want this part without any chicken at all then this dish is definitely […]

  4. November 28, 2016

    […] you I think I am also confused on what’s the difference between Tinola, Pinatisan and Nilaga, as you can see they all look alike so what’s the difference? Well I will […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: