Ensaymada

Ensaymada

Ensaymada or Ensaimada (Spanish) is a pastry product originated in Majorca, Spain. It is a popular food item in the Philippines and Latin American counties that were a former Spanish territory. Traditionally ensaimada is made out of flour, water, sugar, eggs and pork lard called “saim” where it got its name from. In Philippines ensaymada had evolved from using pork lard to butter or shortening, edam cheese and sugar is added for its toppings which make it resemble the French Brioche.

This is a very common type of bread in the Philippines where you can find it in most of the bakeries, but there are other shops that specializes on this type of baked good where you can see the real difference in taste and texture like the Megamelt and again Goldilocks. Some say their secret recipe of making it super soft is using mashed potato in the ingredient which makes sense so I will do something similar but instead of using potatoes I will use sweet potatoes and leverage on its already sweet taste. I guess this is the most time consuming pastry that I ever made, it nearly took me a day for the preparation but I guess it’s worth the wait. The result is a very soft buttery and creamy pastry.


Ingredients

2 1/2 cups bread flour
1/3 cup mashed sweet potato
1/3 cup sugar
2 1/4 tsp rapid rise yeast
1/2 tbsp salt
1/4 cup milk
1/4 cup cream
1/4 cup water
1/3 cup shortening
1 egg
2 egg yolks
melted butter
edam cheese, grated

Method

  1. In a sauce pan heat milk, cream, water and shortening until very warm but not hot.
  2. Mix together 1/2 cup flour, yeast, salt in a mixing bowl.
  3. Place heated milk and shortening in another mixing bowl then gradually mix in the flour mixture in step 2 using a spatula. Once all added using an electric mixer beat the mixture at medium speed for 2 minutes.
  4. Stop the mixer then add the mashed sweet potatoes, egg and 1/2 cup of flour. Beat at high speed for 2 minutes.
  5. Now gradually add the remaining flour, once batter is stiff remove bowl from mixer base then cover with cling wrap. Refrigerate for 2 hours.
  6. Remove from fridge then add egg yolks, mix in low speed until evenly mixed. Remove again from base then cover with cling wrap then refrigerate for at least 4 hours.
  7. Remove dough from the mixing bowl and place it in a smaller aluminium bowl enough to hold the dough. Place the smaller bowl in a bigger bowl filled with ice (this makes the dough cold always which is needed to make handling easier, the warmer it is the more sticky the dough will be).
  8. Pinch a small ball (roughly twice the size of a ping pong ball) out of the dough then roll it into a floured board. The shape should resemble a thick long rope, now start coiling the rope dough then place it into a greased pan.
  9. Once done coiling the entire dough brush top with melted butter then let it rise on a warm place until it doubles its size this might take 1 hr. to 2 hrs. depending on how warm it is. What I usually do to speed up the process is use the oven by turning the heat on for a couple of minutes, turn the heat of then place my dough inside.
  10. Now bake at 180C for 15 minutes, remove from pan then place and cool in a wire rack. Brush with melted butter, sprinkle sugar on top then with edam cheese.


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28 Responses

  1. They look outstanding!
    ūüôā Mandy

  2. Judy says:

    I used sweet potatoes in my dinner rolls at Thanksgiving in place of regular mashed potatoes, it worked great. These look lovely!

  3. saminacooks says:

    Oh WOW..that looks amazing. I love making bread and I am DEFINITELY making this one!

  4. I love that you used the sweet potato in this dish. I’ve never heard of Ensaymada, but I find this pastry very interesting and delectable. Very nice

  5. Meri says:

    These look incredible, I love the substitution of sweet potato, very creative and way to work with the ingredients to get the sweetness! I’ve never baked with potato or sweet potato before, it sounds delicious.

  6. Those looks so delicious!

  7. Carolyn Chan says:

    They look so delicious I can imagine eating one straight out of the oven so it’s still warm… yum!

  8. We here also have something similar, esp sweet potato – plenty used in desserts and cooking too. The coconut on top looks so tempting.

  9. Hi Raymund…these look fantastic! If I can’t find Edam cheese, what could I use as a substitute? The sweet potato addition sound like a great addition!

  10. boogie. says:

    just reading the words “ensaymada” make my mouth water. another post of yours that reminds me of my childhood in the Philippines.

  11. I have never heard of Ensaymada but really liked your post and the recipe, particularly the use of the sweet potato and the cheese alternatives. Sounds like a very tasty recipe, imagine the smell right out of the oven has to be fantastic…

  12. pol says:

    where is the cream and the water? in the procedure, it doesn’t show.

  13. I’m glad you took Nami’s challenge and shared your 7 links. This way I discovered these amazing ensaymada. I have once eaten something similar while visiting Barcelona and totally forgot about them. Now, that I have the recipe I’m so going to enjoy them at breakfast time with my family.
    Thanks for sharing

  14. Edz says:

    what kind of cream you used?

  15. Ivy says:

    Hi what is the name of the bread flour you use?

  16. Ivy says:

    Hi what is the name of the bread flour you used?

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