Misua

Misua comes from the Chinese word “mee sua” which is a very thin salted noodles made from wheat flour.  Misua noodles cook really fast, it will only take around 2 minutes or less.  Misua is not just popular in China and Philippines but also in Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, Brunei and Thailand.


A very heart-warming dish made out of misua noodles and leftover meats like roast chicken and/or fried chops.  I said leftovers because it became a tradition where Christmas celebration in Philippines is a feast like no other, a lot of food are prepared compared to the number of people who will consume it, that’s why afterwards there will be a lot of leftovers that get stuck in the fridge.  Now knowing that New Year is just around the corner these leftovers can still be recycled to make an excellent dish and that is usually misua.  Why misua? In Philippine culture (adapted from the Chinese) like the sotanghon, misua signifies long life that’s why every New Year, and it’s a belief that if you consume dishes like such will give you long life hence it’s a main stay in a Filipino Family New Year’s menu, Like us.

Ingredients

60g misua (that’s around 3 bunches)
1/2 cup pork belly, cubed
1/2 cup shrimps
6 pcs squid balls, quartered
1 cup cabbage, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 large red onion, minced
1 liter chicken broth
freshly ground black pepper
fish sauce
cooking oil
1 pc patola (Luffa or Gourd), sliced (optional)


Method

  1. In a pot saute garlic and onion in oil.
  2. Fry pork belly and fry until brown and crispy
  3. Add squid balls, fry until cooked.
  4. Add chicken broth and patola (if using) bring to a boil and simmer for 4 minutes
  5. Add misua, shrimps and cabbage then simmer for additional 2 minutes
  6. Season with fish sauce and freshly ground black pepper
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6 Responses

  1. Meri says:

    Cheers to eating for a long life!
    What a neat tradition!
    Happy New Year!
    Meri

  2. purplebirdblog says:

    Cool tradition! Here in the south (Texas) we eat black eyed peas (for their resemblance to coins) and greens (color of money) to encourage prosperity. 🙂

  3. Chris says:

    Wow. This looks delicious! Happy New Years

  4. Sugi_84 says:

    are squid balls something you make? or something you buy?

  1. April 15, 2011

    […] ingredient and perhaps most of the Filipinos do, apart from adding this as an ingredient in Misua or Tinola. So it’s time to search online for recipes that use bottle gourd. This vegetable is a […]

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